David Jeremiah

I Hope to Meet You There

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Picture this:  A city shaped like a cube that covers the United States from the Atlantic coast to the middle of Kansas, and from Texas to the Canadian border-1,400 miles long, wide, and high.  It covers about two million square miles of land; but because it’s a cube with room for about 600 “floors”, all total it has 1.2 billion square miles of living space.  That’s the city the Bible calls the New Jerusalem (Revelation 21:2).

Sometimes people wonder whether there will be room in heaven for all the millions of believers destined to go there.  Based on the above dimensions, it would appear so!  The New Jerusalem is not heaven-it’s a city in heaven that will serve as the “capital” of heaven.  In it are the thrones of God and the Lamb, a river of the water of life, and the tree of life:  food, water, and Jesus Christ-everything needed to live forever.  The question is not whether there will be room in the New Jerusalem for everyone-there will be-but rather, will you be there?  Jesus has invited you to join Him there.

Commentary from the Pathways Devotional by David Jeremiah, May 11.

The city is laid out as a square;

its length is as great as its breadth.

And he measured the city with the reed:

twelve thousand furlongs.

Its length, breadth, and height are equal.

Revelation 21:16

The Cold

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As Christians, we have the opportunity every day to pay it forward to those who are lost in this world by giving them a glimpse of Christ through our kindness.  We were each given a gift when Jesus hung on the cross and died for our sins; and every time we demonstrate His love to someone, we not only bless them, we also bless our Lord and Savior.

Let us eagerly search for ways to bless those that God places in our path with the ultimate aim of glorifying our Heavenly Father.

“All the blessings we enjoy are Divine deposits, committed to our trust on this condition, that they should be dispensed for the benefit of our neighbors.”  John Calvin

Portions of commentary from David Jeremiah’s Pathways Devotional, November 18.

Stop Giving Up On People

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Consider the command in Ephesians 4:32 to be kind to one another, tenderhearted, and forgiving.  When we carry resentment in our hearts, it’s like a little pocket of poison that pulls down our personalities and sours our spirits.  But when we’re kind and pleasant, it lightens our burdens and brightens our days-not to mention what it does for others.

God knows how we best function-He created us-and He’s an expert on the care of the soul.  Obedience not only glorifies Him, it blesses our lives.

Commentary from David Jeremiah’s Pathways Devotional, May 10.

For All

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The parable of the Good Samaritan helping the injured Jew is widely accepted as an illustration of how we are to treat others who are in need (Luke 10:25-37).  There is another side to it, however, a side which becomes clear when you learn that Jews and Samaritans were taught to despise each other and that Jesus was telling this parable to a Jewish audience.  Hearing their teacher tell them to “Go and do likewise,” regardless of cultural differences, was overwhelming for them.  In effect, Jesus was trying to open the eyes of their hearts so they could see all human beings as He saw them: in need of a Savior.

Throughout history, the good news of the Gospel has broken down the walls of separation between races and religions because of the one thing we all have in common:  the need for salvation.  The Bible tells us that “there is no difference; for all have sinned and fall short of the glory of God” (Romans 3:22b-23).

Everyone, regardless of race, religion, or creed shares the same title of sinner; and because of Christ’s sacrifice on the Cross, everyone who believes in Him can share the same glorious title of forgiven.

We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal…U.S. Declaration of Independence.

But now in Christ Jesus

you who once were far off

have been brought near

by the blood of Christ.

Ephesians 2:13

Commentary from Pathways Devotional, April 30, by David Jeremiah.

Lean on Me

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Many people think that when God comforts us, our hardships should go away.  But if that were always so, people would turn to God only to be relieved of pain and not out of love for Him.  We must understand that comfort can also mean receiving strength, encouragement, and hope to deal with hardships.  The more we suffer, the more comfort God gives us.  If you are feeling overwhelmed, allow God to comfort you.  Remember that every trial you endure will later become an opportunity to minister to other people suffering similar hardships.

If you have a need today, take it to your Father in heaven knowing that His grace is sufficient for you.  Trust Him for how that grace will be manifested.

Commentary from: The One Year NIV Devotional New Testament, April 16 (Tyndale House Publishers, 2003), and Turning Points Magazine and Devotional, by Dr. David Jeremiah, April 15/16.

Where to Focus

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Warren Bennis, the popular management consultant, wrote in Why Leaders Can’t Lead:  “Magnanimous and/or humble people are notable for their self-possession.  They know who they are, have healthy egos, and take more pride in what they do than in who they are.  They take compliments with a grain of salt and take intelligent criticism without rancor.  Such people learn from their mistakes and don’t harp on the mistakes of others…True leaders are, by definition, both magnanimous and humble.”

Solomon, in writing the Proverbs, agreed, saying that God resists the proud but gives grace to the humble (Proverbs 3:34).  Humility precedes honor (Proverbs 15:33); and humility, coupled with the fear of the Lord, brings “riches, honor, and life” (Proverbs 22:4).

By humility, however, the Bible doesn’t mean a low self-image.  We aren’t to put ourselves down or nurture an inferiority complex.  We’re just to think of Jesus more often than we think of ourselves, and we’re to put the needs of others before our own.  Today, try keeping a window before your face instead of a mirror.

“Humility does not consist simply in thinking cheaply of one’s self so much as in not thinking of self at all-and of Christ more and more.”  Keith Brooks

Commentary from the Pathways Devotional, by David Jeremiah, April 24.

Warren Bennis, Why Leaders Can’t Lead (San Francisco:  Jossey-Bass Publishers, 1989), 118

Unseen

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Have you ever visited the Grand Canyon?  Standing on the rim, peering down into that immense chasm with its vast width and dizzying depths, it’s easy to be awestruck.  There’s an overwhelming sense of majesty and downright terror that we feel while standing on the edge-especially if we’re afraid of heights.  The fear of God is like that.  It isn’t an unhealthy fear, but an overwhelming sense of sheer greatness of God himself.

Touring the Grand Canyon doesn’t diminish our sense of awe; it increases it.  In the same way, having a personal relationship with God through Jesus Christ doesn’t lessen our fear of God; it enhances it.

The angels in heaven are in God’s direct presence, and their song reflects their worship,  “Worthy is the Lamb who was slain to receive power and riches and wisdom, and strength and honor and glory and blessing!”

Familiarity with the Lord never leads to careless devotion.  We never “get used to” Him.  The closer we draw to our Lord, the greater He becomes in our eyes.  And that’s good because the fear of the Lord is the beginning of wisdom.

Commentary from David Jeremiah’s Pathways Devotional, March 2.