Death

Dead or Alive

Nonbelievers are so bound in the sphere of sin, the world (Eph. 2:12), the flesh (Rom. 8:8), and the devil (1 John 5:19) as to be unable to respond to spiritual stimuli; totally devoid of spiritual life. The spiritually dead have no ability to make themselves alive.

Only through a union with Jesus Christ can those hopelessly dead in their sins receive eternal life. Believer’s sins are all put to Christ’s account, nailed to His cross as He paid the penalty in their place, for them, thus satisfying the just wrath of God against crimes requiring punishment in full.

Commentary from the MacArthur study Bible, notes for Colossians 2:13,14.

Supreme Significance

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It is important for us as believers to understand what happened on the cross, and that it was of supreme significance.  Jesus’ crucifixion on a tree is far more than simply the site of a Jewish man’s execution-this was the solution to mankind’s biggest problem: sin and the resulting alienation from God.  The crucifixion of Jesus is the divine transaction that saves us.  Only the blood of Christ can cleanse us from sin and reconcile us to the Father.

Although the Jews and the Romans viewed the crucifixion as the execution of a criminal, God saw the death of His Son as the perfect atoning sacrifice, which allowed for the justification of sinful mankind.

Commentary from the In Touch devotional by Charles Stanley, May 18, 2020.

Death reigned

Romans 5;17a

Adam’s sin brought universal death-exactly opposite the result he expected and Satan had promised: “You will be like God” (Genesis 3:5).

Unlike Adam’s act, Christ’s act has-and will-accomplish exactly what He intended, i.e., spiritual life.

Commentary from the MacArthur study Bible, notes for Romans 5:17.

Justified

Romans 5;9

Justified-to be declared righteous, by His blood-through His violent, substitutionary death.  Christ bore the full fury of God’s wrath in the believing sinner’s place, and there is none left for him (see Romans 8:1, and 1 Thessalonians 1:10; 5:9).

Commentary from the MacArthur study Bible, notes for Romans 3:24; 5:9.

The aroma of death and of life

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Paul used the style of Hebrew superlatives to emphasize the twofold effect of gospel preaching.  To some, the message brings eternal life and ultimate glorification.  To others, it is a stumbling stone of offense that brings eternal death.  No one in his own strength is adequate or competent to serve God in the ways and with the power that Paul has been describing.

Commentary from the MacArthur study Bible, notes for 2 Corinthians 2:16.

Do This and You Will Live

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“Do and live” is the promise of the law.  But since no sinner can obey perfectly, the impossible demands of the law are meant to drive us to seek divine mercy (Galatians 3:10-13,22-25).

Commentary from the MacArthur study Bible, notes for Luke 10:28.