Life

Fathers Matter-Leading the Band


Families are struggling today, and this has been happening for decades. Although there are many theories as to why, the best solution is found in God’s Word. After all, He designed the family to be the foundational unit of society, and He knows best how it should operate. No family goes without hardship, but God’s principles can help people navigate those ups and downs in a way that glorifies Him. Scripture clearly teaches that the Lord has entrusted headship in the home to the husband and father (1 Corinthians 11:3). This doesn’t mean that men are superior or more spiritual than women (Galatians 3:27-28); it simply shows that God, in His sovereign wisdom, has given them different roles. Even though our culture may find this offensive, it doesn’t change God’s ordained order, nor does is excuse fathers who abdicate this role. According to Scripture, the father’s responsibility is to lead his family physically, emotionally, and spiritually. Most dads work hard to provide for material needs, and many give the family adequate time and love. But how many are diligent to lead spiritually? Dads are responsible for teaching their children to read Scripture and pray, as well as for modeling righteousness. Wives and churches contribute to the spiritual training of children, too, but fathers will be held accountable to the Lord for spiritual leadership. Although this assignment is daunting, God has provided both His Spirit and His Word to guide and empower dads to accomplish it. When fathers take their rightful place, family relationships will improve.

Commentary from the In Touch devotional by Charles Stanley, June 16, 2019.

Our True Value



We need to understand how God sees us. He says we are His workmanship – His masterpieces. Each person is thoughtfully designed by the Creator for His purpose. The differences that cause us to make comparisons and feel discouraged are the very qualities that the Lord created to bring Him glory. Feelings of inferiority are a hindrance to becoming the people that the heavenly Father designed us to be and a deterrent to fulfilling His purpose for our lives. When it comes to our value, we either accept the truth of His appraisal or decide not to believe Him and instead rely on our own feelings.

Commentary from the In Touch devotional by Charles Stanley, June 10, 2019.

Alive Together with Christ


Salvation is for God’s glory by putting on display His boundless mercy and love for those who are spiritually dead because of their sinfulness. Far more than anything else, a spiritually dead person needs to be made alive by God. Salvation brings spiritual life to the dead. Not only is the believer dead to sin and alive to righteousness through Christ’s resurrection, but he also enjoys his Lord’s exaltation and shares in His preeminent glory.

Commentary from the MacArthur study Bible, notes for Ephesians 2:4-6.

Feelings of Inferiority and a Broken World


The world bombards us with messages that can trigger feelings of inferiority. Happiness and satisfaction are promised if we will only drive the latest car, wear the newest styles, or build up those muscles while shedding pounds. If we do not guard ourselves from commercialism, it will drive the truth of God from our mind, and we’ll pursue a fruitless search for adequacy and value. So often we look at externals to prove to ourselves and others that we’re valuable. But the misery of inferiority is never what God intends for His children. Its seed usually takes root in the impressionable hearts of the young and thrives in an atmosphere of comparison.

Commentary from the In Touch devotional by Charles Stanley, June 10 and 11, 2019.

Genuine Salvation


Genuine salvation always results in transformation. When we receive Jesus as our personal Savior, He comes to live within us through the Holy Spirit. Our old way of life no longer fits our new identity, and the Spirit works within us to make us more like Christ.

Commentary from the In Touch devotional by Charles Stanley, May 21, 2019.

Counting the Cost


Much of Christianity has a distorted view of discipleship. In our desire to see more people come to Christ, we may be guilty of offering a gospel that emphasizes the benefits of following Jesus while avoiding any mention of the cost involved. Since Christ didn’t sail through life without any challenges, why should we? For example, contrary to what many contemporary sermons suggest, following Jesus may not make your relationships better. It could become a source of contention because a true disciple’s love, devotion, and loyalty to Christ supersedes every other relationship. As Christians, we’ll frequently be tempted to compromise in order to avoid misunderstanding, criticism, rejection, or persecution. But as Christ’s followers, we are called to live a crucified life – and compromise undercuts the wholehearted nature of crucifixion. We cannot pursue the acceptance of the world and at the same time follow the Lord. Until we stand with both feet on the side of obedience, we forfeit assurance of God’s peace and blessings. Although discipleship is costly, the reward is great.

Commentary from the In Touch devotional by Charles Stanley, June 3, 2019.

Your strength


Staying focused on the Lord can be hard. The flesh prefers to seek security by thinking through all possible angles. Our tendency is to weigh what we think could happen against what “experts” say will happen, and then to evaluate possible ways of preventing our worst fears from coming true. Instead of becoming more confident, we begin to realize how powerless we are. Thankfully, we serve an almighty God who says, “Surely I will help you”. We can count on Him. By focusing on our circumstances, we’re actually choosing to feel anxiety and doubt. But these emotions don’t belong in a believer’s daily life. Instead, trust in the promises God has given us. He’s filled His Word with scriptural anchors to keep His children steady in the faith.

Commentary from the In Touch devotional by Charles Stanley, May 29, 2019.

The Sacrificial Lamb


If animal’s blood could actually erase sin-debt, we’d still be offering those frequent sacrifices and Jesus’ death would have been unnecessary. Yet we must remember that though the act itself had no saving power, the ritual of sacrifice was God’s idea (Leviticus 4). He established such offerings as a powerful illustration of the seriousness and penalty of sin. The practice also pointed to Christ’s perfect sacrificial death on our behalf and the salvation He offers.

Commentary from the In Touch devotional by Charles Stanley, May 27, 2019.