Psalms

Ignoring the Word


Putting together a toy or a piece of furniture rarely goes as smoothly as expected. This is especially true if we don’t read the instructions. Perhaps they’re too long or difficult to understand, so we ignore them. Then we wonder why the project doesn’t turn out right. This is how many believers live the Christian life. They try to figure it out without referring to God’s Word. The Bible is too long, they think. But ignoring the Word of God is dangerous. When we stop reading Scripture and applying its principles, we don’t just stand still; we actually start drifting away from God. If you desire to glorify God and overcome worries, fears, and sin, the Scripture must be your priority. Reading, studying, and applying the Word may require sacrifices, but the reward of knowing your Savior better and living a life pleasing to God is worth it. Commentary from the In Touch devotional by Charles Stanley, October 6, 2021.

Seeking Safety

Here’s a hard question: If we know and believe worshipping idols cannot satisfy us, why do we struggle to choose loving God over being devoted to the things of this world? Perhaps one of the reasons we turn away from the Lord is because He requires authenticity and righteousness that our idols don’t. When we construct our idols, we can control them – ultimately, that puts us in charge. But we cannot control God.

In Psalm 135, we read about idols. An idol – which doesn’t issue commands, hold us accountable, or hear if we’re being untruthful – can in many ways feel safer than the Lord. But we have to ask another difficult question: Is false security worth it?

Commentary from the In Touch devotional by Charles Stanley, April 18, 2021.

God’s perspective

When times are frightening and uncertain – whether personally, nationally, or globally – the place to find comfort and assurance is the Bible, especially the book of Psalms. Scripture helps us look at circumstances from God’s perspective. That reassures us of His love and care for us and lifts our eyes to a higher hope than anything this world can offer. We all want to find peace, and the first step is to cease striving (v. 10). Remember that the Lord is always with you, and know that His kingdom is coming.

Commentary from the In Touch devotional by Charles Stanley, November 10, 2020.

When you have Everything

Do you realize Jesus knows what it feels like to have human struggles? Our Savior understands precisely how we feel because He went through the same types of situations we do (Hebrews 4:14-16). Though our specific circumstances don’t match the Lord’s, we have much in common with what He experienced and felt. Jesus suffered exhaustion, hunger, thirst, and pain just as we do. He also knows the heartache of being lonely, misunderstood, hated, rejected, and unjustly treated.

Whatever you’re going through right now, remember that Jesus knows how you feel and sympathizes with your pain and weakness. He may not remove the anguish or change your situation, but He does promise He will always be with you-which is everything.

Commentary from the In Touch devotional by Charles Stanley, December 7, 2020.

A Great Task

Living together in a way that evokes the glad song of Psalm 133 is one of the great and arduous tasks before Christ’s people. Nothing requires more attention and energy. It is easier to do almost anything else. It is far easier to deal with people as problems to be solved than to have anything to do with them in community. If a person can be isolated from the family (husband, wife, parents, children), the church, or others around them (neighbors) then be professionally counseled, advised, and guided without the complications of all those relationships, things are very much simpler. But if such practices are engaged in systematically, they become an avoidance of community.

Community is a ‘place’ where people pay attention to each other; where each person is taken seriously; where each person learns to trust; where each person depends on others; where each person is compassionate with others; where each person rejoices with others.

Commentary from Masterwork Bible study, Fall 2020, Spiritual Warfare lesson by Jerry Rankin, page 82.

He will speak peace

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For those willing to hear, God’s “voice” can be discerned through a variety of sources.  The most obvious is the Bible, but He can also call to us through the spoken or written words of other Christians.  And at times He speaks through circumstances and the wonders of creation (Romans 1:20).  We would be amazed if we knew all the ways our loving Father tries to get our attention.

Commentary from the In Touch devotional by Charles Stanley, June 3, 2020.